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Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

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Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator
Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator – 1 of 4 Joey Henney, 65, hugs her emotional support alligator, Wally, at their home in York Haven, Pennsylvania. On Tuesday, January 22, 2019, Henney said he got permission from his doctor to use Wally as an emotional support animal after he didn’t want to take depression medication. (Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP) 1 of 4 Joey Henney, 65, hugs her emotional support alligator, Wally, at her home in York Haven, Pennsylvania. On Tuesday, January 22, 2019, Henney said he got doctor’s approval to use Wally as an emotional support animal because he didn’t want to take depression medication. (Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

YORK HAVEN, Pennsylvania. (AP) – A Pennsylvania man says his emotional support alligator helps him deal with depression.

Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

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Joey Henney, 65, said his emotional support animal named Wally loves to snuggle and cuddle despite being a five-foot alligator. The York Haven man said he got permission from his doctor to use Wally as an emotional support animal because he didn’t want to take depression medication, he told Philly.com.

York County Man Has Emotional Support Alligator

“I had Wally and when I got home and was by his side everything was fine,” he said. “My doctor knew about Wally and thought it worked, so why not?”

Wally was rescued from outside Orlando at 14 months old and is still growing; Henny said that one day Wally could grow to 16 feet. Henny says that Wally eats chicken wings and shares an indoor plastic pool with a small rescue alligator named Scrappy.

Wally, who turns 4 this year, is a big teddy bear, according to Henny. According to him, the cold-blooded reptile loves to rest his snout against Henny’s snout and “loves to cuddle.”

Henny acknowledged that Wally is still a dangerous wild animal and could probably rip his arm off, but says he was never afraid of him.

Emotional Support Gator. Really

Henny’s origin also shows comfort with beings like Wally. From 1989 to 2000, he hosted a show called “Joie Henney’s Outdoors” on ESPN Outdoors, according to the York Daily Record.

“He’s just like a dog,” Henny told a woman on a recent walk at a nursing home. “He wants to be loved and stroked.” This copy is for personal, non-commercial use only. To order ready-to-present copies of Toronto Star content for distribution to colleagues, clients, or customers, or to inquire about permissions/licensing, go to: www.TorontoStarReprints.com

Wally, a 4-year-old emotional support alligator, basks in the sun as his owner, Joey Henney, rubs his head at the Lutheran SpiritTrust Village in York, Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

YORK HAVEN, Pennsylvania. Wally is a shy, big teddy bear who loves to snuggle and cuddle, an animal so laid back that he makes friends with the little goldfish and bullfrogs he has to eat.

Man’s 5 Foot Long Alligator Serves As Emotional Support

Joey Henney, 65, has been saying these things about Wally, a 5-foot-tall, 60-pound alligator who lives in his living room in York County, but the words don’t catch on and certainly don’t make sense when they share a couch. with the indicated alligator. However, when the panic of running or fighting subsides, Wally appears to snuggle up to Henny on the other side of the brown section, often resting his muzzle in his lap rather than tearing his ear off on the trademark death list.

Wally is Henny’s registered emotional support animal, similar to a cold-blooded golden retriever. His story is the latest and arguably the most extreme in the growing world of ESAs, which are often doctor-approved and grant access to restaurants, businesses and even airplanes. The emotional support peacock was banned from flying last year.

The person who responded to an email from a reporter about Wally from America’s Service Dog Registration website said, “Our therapist would never approve of a client having an alligator as an emotional support animal.”

“My doctor wanted to put me on medication for depression, and I hate taking medication. I had Wally and when I came home and was with him everything was fine,” he said. “My doctor knew about Wally and thought it worked, so why not?”

Man Says Emotional Support Alligator Helps His Depression

The depression quickly hit like a summer storm with the deaths of three close friends. The feeling swept over Henny, and he was afraid that he would never continue.

Henney grew up on a farm nearby in Dover, York, and took care of injured owls so they could fly. He served in the Marine Corps, rode bulls in rodeos, and broke planks of wood in half, being a skilled martial artist. He made a living from construction and later hosted local hunting and television shows.

The three men, who died within days of each other, were intertwined in those decades, he said. In a way, Wally filled the void, the companionship he had lost. One day he came and slept with her when she was sick.

Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

Wally, who turns four in July, was rescued from outside Orlando when he was 14 months old. Henny said that Wally could grow from 14 to 16 feet tall and weigh between 900 and 1100 pounds. Wally eats chicken wings and shares a 300 gallon plastic pond indoors with Scrappy, a smaller and younger alligator that the family also rescued. Wally’s favorite TV shows are, of course, The Alligator Boys and The Swamp People. He also loves to watch The Lion King.

Wally, The Emotional Support Alligator, Took A Splash At Philly’s Love Park On Friday

Alligators are definitely dangerous, but more to dogs and cats than humans. In Florida, home to 1.3 million alligators, there were 410 unprovoked bites and 25 deaths between 1948 and 2018. In one infamous case, a young man was mauled and drowned by an alligator while on vacation at Disneyland. This boy, Henny pointed out, was not eaten.

Wally, Henny had warned, was still a wild animal that could rip his arm off now and make it worse later. But he doesn’t think it will happen. Wally has appeared at major central and minor league baseball games in York. He has an appointment next month at York Central Market.

“He never tried to bite anyone,” Henny said. “I don’t force it on people. I tell people to respect him, not be afraid of him. He won’t harm you.”

Harnessed by the red ESA chain, Wally perks up, eager to run around the house and climb into the cupboard by the kitchen sink.

Wallygator, The Emotional Support Alligator, Spotted Cooling Off In Philadelphia’s Love Park

Copyright owned by or used under license from Toronto Star Newspapers Limited. All rights reserved. Publication or redistribution of this content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Toronto Star Newspapers Limited and/or its licensors. To order copies of Toronto Star articles, go to: www.TorontoStarReprints.com Joey Henney of Strinetown lifts his emotional support animal, Wally, to the table for a presentation at the Lutheran Village of SpiriTrust in York, Pennsylvania on January 21st. September 14, 2019 (Ty Lore/York Daily Record via AP)

Joey Henney, 65, said his emotional support animal named Wally loves to snuggle and cuddle despite being a five-foot alligator. The York Haven man said he got permission from his doctor to use Wally as an emotional support animal because he didn’t want to take depression medication, he told Philly.com.

Joey Henney, 65, hugs her emotional support alligator named Wally at their home in York Haven, Pennsylvania. January 22, 2019 (Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer/AP)

Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

“I had Wally and when I got home and was by his side everything was fine,” he said. “My doctor knew about Wally and thought it worked, so why not?”

The Emotional Support Alligator That Helps A York County Man Deal With Depression

Wally was rescued from outside Orlando at 14 months old and is still growing; Henny said that one day Wally could grow to 16 feet. Henny says that Wally eats chicken wings and shares an indoor plastic pool with a small rescue alligator named Scrappy.

Wally, who turns 4 this year, is a big teddy bear, according to Henny. According to him, the cold-blooded reptile loves to rest his snout against Henny’s snout and “loves to cuddle.”

Joey Henney holds Wally, a 4-foot emotional support alligator, at SpiritTrust Lutheran Village in York, Pennsylvania. Henny says he got permission from his doctor to use Wally as an emotional support animal because he didn’t want to take his depression medication. (Thai Lore/York Daily Record via AP)

Henny acknowledged that Wally is still a dangerous wild animal and could probably rip his arm off, but says he was never afraid of him.

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Henny’s origin also shows comfort with beings like Wally. From 1989 to 2000, he hosted a show called “Joie Henney’s Outdoors” on ESPN Outdoors, according to the York Daily Record.

“He’s like a dog,” Henny told a woman during a recent walk at a senior center. “He wants to be loved and stroked.”

Wally the emotional support alligator visits nursing homes and according to his owner looks like a dog… https://t.co/5s0iOK3tSX pic.twitter.com/EblfiTepxP — AJC (@ajc) January 18, 2019

Philadelphia Emotional Support Alligator

Earlier this week, alligators in the North Carolina swamps made headlines when they were caught on film with their snouts rising into the water as temperatures dropped below freezing.

Emotional Support Alligator Strolls On Leash Through Philadelphia Park

Last year, alligators in a swamp park exhibited the same behavior, garnering worldwide attention for their rare winter survival.

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